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Die Suche erzielte 2 Treffer.

F. Scott Fitzgerald and His German War Heroes Beitrag

Erich Ludendorff and Otto Braun

Horst H. Kruse

Germanisch-Romanische Monatsschrift, Jahrgang 70 (2020), Ausgabe 1, Seite 1 - 18

To make up for having missed combat experience in the Great War, Fitzgerald read numerous books about the conflict and also visited its memorial sites in Europe. Two works by former enemies figure prominently on his reading lists and document his empathetic identification with the lost cause of the enemy: the memoir of Ludendorff, commander in chief of the German forces, and the diary of Otto Braun, a young soldier who died in battle. The impact on him of these works (previously neither explored nor ever assessed in terms of his writing) informs sections of ‚Tender Is the Night‘ and helped Fitzgerald to conceive and shape his “Count of Darkness” stories as a parable for the New Deal.


Long Dying Falls and Modernist Convergences Beitrag

David Garnett’s ‚Lady Into Fox‘ (1922), Thomas Mann’s ‚The Magic Mountain‘ (1924), F. Scott Fitzgerald’s ‚Tender Is the Night‘ (1934)

Horst H. Kruse

Germanisch-Romanische Monatsschrift, Jahrgang 68 (2018), Ausgabe 4, Seite 395 - 403

Evidence of F. Scott Fitzgerald’s familiarity with the writings of David Garnett and Thomas Mann, substantiated and further enhanced by additional evidence cited in this essay, helps to establish ‚Lady Into Fox‘ (1922), ‚The Magic Mountain‘ (1924), and ‚Tender Is the Night‘ (1934) as a triad of mutually enlightening novels that share important aspects of composition, structure, theme, and reception. In having the protagonist lose his autonomy and undergo a dying fall into obscurity, with the Great War directly or indirectly (through the author’s non-combatant involvement) promoting such loss, the English and the German novel, as European precursors, provide essential foils for a comprehensive appreciation of ‚Tender Is the Night‘ as their American successor in the international convergence of modernist practices. Thomas Mann’s account of the reception of his novel occasions a review of the circumstances that led to the delayed establishment of Fitzgerald’s 1934 first-edition modernist text of ‚Tender Is the Night‘ as the standard text in the early 1970s.

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